Planning Your Route

map-pin-icon

What to think about when planning a route?

  • Make sure the route is appropriate to audience – distance, gradients, etc.
  • Think about the start point – toilets, refreshments, parking, bus route
  • Avoid crossing busy roads, where possible
  • Think about your target audience – start time
  • Pre-walk the route and risk assess
walking-icon

Walk planning

  • Walking routes should be:
  • Safe
  • Simple
  • Able to cater for all abilities
  • Well maintained

Wider footpaths allow people to over take if they want to increase their pace.

map-pin-icon

Route Planning

Norfolk Trails

On the Norfolk Trails website you’ll find circular walks, long and short linear routes.

You can also find information on our access tested routes.

http://maps.norfolk.gov.uk/trails/

NCC Public Rights of Way map

If you like the idea of creating your own route from scratch, find a map of all the Public Rights of Way Norfolk has to offer on the norfolk.gov website.

http://maps.norfolk.gov.uk/highways/

map-pin-icon

Creating a map

You can also create routes and calculate distance by using the following websites:

map-pin-icon

Go on a recce

Scouting your location prior to your event is a great way to assess it’s suitability, local facilities and accessibility.

Familiarising yourself with your route is also important as a part of your risk assessment!

map-pin-icon

Accessibility considerations

  • Location – not isolated, sensory, familiar – parks, proms – not main roads or traffic
  • Accessibility – parking, flat hard surfaces
  • Facilities – toilets and shelter from weather
  • Refreshment venue
  • Seating at regular intervals
  • Walks need to be easily shortened or lengthened
  • Location – not isolated, sensory, familiar (parks, proms), not on main roads or traffic
  • Paths with similar smooth surfaces. Sudden changes, especially dark areas could seem like holes or areas that people need to step over due to a reduction in space awareness and depth perception.
  • Entrances and access needs to be wide enough for wheelchairs
  • Walks with high walls/hedges will mean that people in wheelchairs will have a reduced view – for example if walking by a river/sea/landscape
  • Walks will be a social experience and so be prepared to stop and take in the fresh air and scenery
  • Volunteers need to be friendly, patient, flexible and caring – for “Memory Walks” – becoming a Dementia Friend would be an advantage